Our Strive Programme

Every child at Sandroyd is involved in our ‘Strive’ programme. It takes its name from our motto: Niti Est Nitere; To Strive is to Shine.

Sandroyd have been running a timetabled Skills and Knowledge programme (SKULL) for the past five years incorporating reasoning and thinking skills, mindfulness and a whole raft of essential character building qualities. This programme, has evolved to become an integral part of the Sandroyd curriculum alongside rigorous academic preparation. Our new ‘Strive’ curriculum launched in 2017, builds on the success of SKULL but importantly, introduces new themes and challenges, utilising our significant experience and expertise in this area. We aim to ensure our children become resilient, balanced and adaptable as they rise through Sandroyd, in preparation for their Senior schools and beyond.

At Sandroyd, we fully understand that much of what makes you happy, confident and successful in life cannot all be taught via sedentary studies in a classroom. This is why our ambitious Strive programme is an essential part of our curriculum.

Our unique programme has been created specifically for Sandroyd children to ensure they are developing a raft of qualities sought by senior schools, universities and the world of work. By carrying out a range of targeted exercises and tasks throughout each year group, our children are nurtured to build their self-confidence, creativity and resilience. We encourage them to explore who they are and how to overcome uncertainties, which test their courage and control.

Strive is not a stand-alone programme; Strive is at the very heart of our school motto, and it is at the very heart of all we do at Sandroyd. Its principles are embedded in everyday school life, from promoting good manners to our approach in the classrooms; in delivering our best performances on the stage and on the games pitch. Our children have helped to shape our Strive curriculum and we continue to adapt it to suit their interests, nurturing resilient and self-motivated children, who love to learn.

How is this achieved and how is this delivered?

The Strive programme is delivered in forty-minute sessions each afternoon, with the exception of match days. There are six areas that define our outcomes and within each area are a number of different activities, which are delivered to each child. In total, there are over 50 activities as part of the Strive timetable delivered by specialists in each area.

  • Enlighten. To promote intellectual curiosity and a love of wisdom.
  • Explore. To face the unfamiliar, promote teamwork and leadership, focusing on the outdoor environment.
  • Enquire. To ask questions, debate and discuss; challenge assumptions and stereotypes.
  • Innovate. To generate new ideas, invent, rethink, deconstruct and reassemble.
  • Adapt. To face new situations, accept failure, adjust to changes, improvise and make improvements.
  • Reflect. To pause, to think, review and link what we have learnt to other areas of life and learning.

Contact our Head of Strive

We would be very happy to talk to other schools that are interested in developing a similar programme, and indeed we would be very happy to involve local primary schools in our Strive programme.

Mrs Cath Christopher is our Director of Strive and has overview of the whole of the Strive curriculum. Please click here to contact her directly.

“That our classrooms still mostly look like they did a hundred years ago isn’t quaint; it’s absurd. How can a teacher or even a stack of books be the sole
source of information for kids who can access the sum of all human knowledge in seconds from a device in their pockets, and do so far more quickly than their teachers or parents? The world is changing too quickly to teach kids everything they need to know; they must be given the methods and means to teach themselves. This means creative problem-solving, dynamic collaboration online and off, real-time research, and the ability to modify and make their own digital tools.”

Garry Kasparov
Deep Thinking: Where Machine Intelligence Ends and Human Creativity Begins